Species-specific nest predation depends on the total passerine nest density in open-nesting passerinesстатья

Статья опубликована в высокорейтинговом журнале

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Статья опубликована в журнале из списка Web of Science и/или Scopus
Дата последнего поиска статьи во внешних источниках: 10 августа 2018 г.

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[1] Species-specific nest predation depends on the total passerine nest density in open-nesting passerines / D. Shitikov, T. Vaytina, T. Makarova et al. // Journal of Ornithology. — 2018. — Vol. 159, no. 2. — P. 483–491. A large part of the variation in bird reproductive success is often explained by nest predation. Many studies report negative relationships between breeding density and reproductive success due to the predation effect. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the total nest density should affect nest predation stronger than the nest density of a single species. We used a large sample (n = 320) of Booted Warbler Iduna caligata and Whinchat Saxicola rubetra nests obtained during a period of 6 years in abandoned fields. We used model selection to evaluate effects of density, nest age, season and year on daily nest survival rate. We used a single-species (the distance to the nearest conspecific nest and the number of conspecific nests around the focal nest) and total (the distance to the nearest nest of any passerine species and the total number of passerine nests around the focal nest) nest-density variables. Our results suggest that nest density affects nest survival negatively. Both Booted Warbler and Whinchat nests were more likely to be depredated when neighboring nests of any passerine species were closer. Daily nest survival rates were better predicted by the total nest density than single-species nest density. We suggest that generalist predators performing an area-restricted search may play an important role in nest predation in abandoned fields. The total nest density should be estimated when studying density-dependent nest predation as conclusions about nest predation based on single-species nest densities may be incorrect. The potential impact of density-dependent predation on real nests should be considered when designing artificial nest experiments. [ DOI ]

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