Genetic background of social interactions in a Siberian population of Pied Flycatcherтезисы доклада

Дата последнего поиска статьи во внешних источниках: 28 мая 2015 г.

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[1] Genetic background of social interactions in a siberian population of pied flycatcher / V. G. Grinkov, A. Bauer, H. Sternberg, M. Wink // Ornithological Science. — Vol. 13 of Supplement. — Ornithological Society of Japan Tokyo, Japan, 2014. — P. 2–2. On the basis of DNA analyses, we present here evidence for various social and mating relationships among Pied Flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in western Siberia. In2005, we collected blood samples from all birds breeding in large study plots. In total 1969 blood samples were taken (250 nests, 485 adults, 1484 nestlings). For every DNA sample eight microsatellite loci (FHY336, FHY403, FHY427, FHY452, FHU1, FHU2, FHU3, FHU5c) were amplified by two multiplexPCRs (Set FHY, Set FHU) and analysed by capillary electrophoresis MegaBACE). 154 families (61.6 percent) were socially and genetically monogamous (every nestling in the brood was sired by the brood-rearing adults at the nest). In the rest of the families, we found evidence for a great variation of social and genetic interactions between birds. Males and females can copulate with more than one partner. Males can attract more than one female and sometimes do not feed nestlings or sometimes feed them in more than one brood (polygynous males which rear nestlings in a second brood). Males can adopt other (not genetically related) nestlings and participate in their rearing. Males can help other pairs of flycatchers to feed the nestlings. Females can adopt another clutch at the incubation stage. Females can lay eggs that were fathered by more than one male. Females can lay eggs in the nests of other pairs (egg dumping). In the studied population, 79.1 percent (1174) of nestlings were reared by their genetic parents, 12.1 percent (179) of nestlings were reared by their genetic mother and social father, 5.9 percent (87) of nestlings were reared by their genetic father and a social mother, and 2.9 percent (44) of nestlings were reared by social but genetically unrelated parents. Our study shows that almost all possible social and genetic interactions exist in a socially monogamous species.

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